Evaluation

The Voice Evaluation involves numerous assessments to develop a diagnosis and devise a voice therapy plan of care.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their voice problem and its impact on vocal activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their voice problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of vocal handicap that the client experiences from their voice problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized assessment of how your voice sounds and functions, including recording your voice for acoustic analysis (computerized analysis of the client’s recorded voice signal). The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess the client’s pitch, loudness, and vocal quality.
  • The last component of the Voice Evaluation involves testing the client’s ability to efficiently produce a healthy voice by trying different therapeutic techniques for voice.

Occupational Voice Evaluation for singers and professional speakers with a voice disorder involves additional testing in addition to the general voice evaluation

  • The client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their singing and occupational voice. This self-assessment will determine the level of occupational vocal handicap that the client experiences from their voice problem.
  • The clinician will complete a standardized assessment of how your voice sounds and functions in occupational activities requiring voice, including recording your voice for acoustic analysis (computerized analysis of the client’s recorded voice signal). The client will perform voice tasks related to their occupation that allow the clinician to comprehensively assess the client’s pitch, loudness, and vocal quality.
  • The clinician will test the client’s ability to efficiently produce a healthy voice during occupational activities by trying different therapeutic techniques for singing and professional speaking voice.

A Speech Sound Evaluation involves numerous assessments to develop a diagnosis and devise a speech therapy plan of care.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their speech problem and its impact on speaking activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their speech problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of handicap that the client experiences from their speech problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized assessment of how your speaking sounds and is functioning, including recording your speech for acoustic analysis (computerized analysis of the client’s recorded speech signal). The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess the speech sounds that the client is capable of producing typically vs. atypical as well as those sounds that are not produced at all. In addition, testing will assess other aspects of speech including rate, intonation, voicing, pitch variance, and resonance.
  • The last component of the Speech Sound Evaluation involves testing the client’s ability to produce typical speech by trying different therapeutic techniques to elicit more typical speech sounds or other speaking attributes.

A Fluency Evaluation involves numerous assessments to develop a diagnosis and devise a fluency therapy plan of care.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their fluency problem and its impact on speaking activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their fluency problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of handicap that the client experiences from their fluency problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized assessment of how your speaking fluency, including recording your speech for acoustic analysis (computerized analysis of the client’s recorded speech signal). The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess the fluency of speech including typically vs. atypical disfluencies.
  • The last component of the Fluency Evaluation involves testing the client’s ability to produce fluent speech by trying different therapeutic techniques that improve speaking fluency.

A Motor Speech Evaluation involves numerous assessments to develop a diagnosis and devise a therapy plan of care for the motor speech disorder.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their motor speech problem and its impact on speaking activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their motor speech problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of handicap that the client experiences from their motor speech problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized assessment of how your speaking ability, including recording your speech for acoustic analysis (computerized analysis of the client’s recorded speech signal). The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess motor speech production.
  • The last component of the Motor Speech Evaluation involves testing the client’s ability to produce more intelligible speech by trying different therapeutic techniques that improve speech production.

A Clinical Swallow Evaluation involves numerous non-instrumental assessments to develop a diagnosis and devise a therapy plan of care for the swallowing disorder.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their swallowing problem and its impact on mealtime activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their swallowing problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of handicap that the client experiences from their swallowing problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized assessment of your swallowing ability, including an oral motor examination to assess the integrity of certain muscles and nerves of the head and neck. The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess swallowing ability by eating and drinking various consistencies and textures.
  • The last component of the Clinical Swallow Evaluation involves testing the client’s ability to swallow more effectively, efficiently, and safely by trying different therapeutic techniques that improve swallowing ability.

A Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) involves instrumental assessment to develop a diagnosis and devise a therapy plan of care for the swallowing disorder.

  • First, information is gathered from the client about the nature of their swallowing problem and its impact on mealtime activities and life participation.
  • Then, the client will complete a standardized self-assessment of their swallowing problem. This self-assessment will determine the level of handicap that the client experiences from their swallowing problem.
  • Next, the clinician will complete a standardized instrumental assessment of your swallowing ability, including an oral motor examination to assess the integrity of certain muscles and nerves of the head and neck. The client will perform tasks that allow the clinician to assess swallowing ability by eating and drinking various consistencies and textures while a flexible endoscope is placed to visualize your throat (pharynx) and voice box (larynx).
  • The last component of the Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) involves testing the client’s ability to swallow more effectively, efficiently, and safely by trying different therapeutic techniques that improve swallowing ability with the flexible endoscope in place.